Program Standard 3: Questions and Answers

What do CASC Coaches do?

    Administrator induction coaches establish and maintain a formal, professional relationship with the candidate. They focus on the candidate's development and growth directed toward the attainment of professional and organizational leadership goals. The coach guides the new leader by creating conditions for reflection, dialogue, and action that support the new leader in building and extending her or his knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet expectations expressed in the CPSEL. 

What is the difference between a Coach and a Mentor?

      A Coach for a new administrator in a CASC induction program is trained and skilled in applying a variety of coaching strategies, skills and resources that can be customized for the context and needs of the candidate. Administrator coaches have a formal role with the candidate and focus on the candidate's understanding and application of CPSEL-based leadership outcomes.

      A Mentor is an experienced practitioner who has an informal relationship with a candidate, fostering an understanding of culture, expectations, and the candidate's place and possible contributions to the work environment. A mentor provides a willing, nonjudgmental ear, counsel when sought and focuses on topics determined by the candidate. 

What is important for coaches to know to be successful in coaching CASC candidates/new administrators?

    Effective coaches have a working knowledge of both leadership standards (CPSEL) and the developmental stages of leadership. In addition, they have knowledge of organizational culture, systems thinking, adult learning theory, and deep familiarity with the demands and complexity of the work of the candidates. Initial and ongoing training for coaches often address these items, refreshing and deepening the coaches' knowledge and practice. 

Who is responsible for CASC program coaches?

    The induction program selects, prepares, assigns, supports, and supervises coaches, using well-defined criteria. (CASC Program Standard 3). Through partnership agreements (CASC Program Standard 2), the employer can be assigned responsibilities such as the identification, selection, training, matching, and retention of coaches. 

What initial preparation or training do coaches receive before engaging in CASC induction coaching?

    Coaches receive training prior to being assigned to a candidate. Initial training includes the development of knowledge and skills of coaching, goal setting, use of appropriate coaching instruments, and processes of formative and summative assessment designed to support candidate growth in the leadership competencies outlined in the CPSEL. 

What other learning support for CASC coaches is expected from an approved program?

    The program provides coaches with ongoing training to refine coaching skills and engages them in ongoing professional learning in current educational trends, research and policy changes. The program provides ongoing support for individual coaching challenges, reflection on coaching practice, and opportunities for networking with coaching peers. 

How are a CASC candidate and induction coach matched?

    The program identifies and assigns one of its coaches to each candidate within the first 30 days of days of the candidate's admission to the program, matching the coach and candidate according to defined criteria consistent with their assigned responsibilities. Clear procedures are in place for reassignment of coaches, if the candidate/coach pairing is not effective. 

What does CASC Program Standard 3 say about coaches working in administrator induction programs?

Clear Administrative Services Credential (CASC) Program Handbook, June 2014
3: Selection and Training of Coaches pp. 28-29The induction program selects, prepares, assigns, supports, and supervises coaches, using well-defined criteria.
Coaches receive initial training prior to being assigned to a candidate.
Initial training includes the development of knowledge and skills of: coaching, goal setting, use of appropriate coaching instruments, and processes of formative and summative assessment designed to support candidate growth in the leadership competencies outlined in Standard 5 (CPSEL) of the Administrative Services Credential Induction Program Standards.
The program provides ongoing training to refine coaching skills, engage in ongoing professional learning in current educational trends, research and policy changes.
The program provides ongoing support for individual coaching challenges, reflection on coaching practice, and opportunities for networking with coaching peers.
The program identifies and assigns one of its coaches to each candidate within the first 30 days of days of the candidate's admission to the program, matching the coach and candidate according to defined criteria.
Clear procedures are in place for reassignment of coaches, if the candidate/coach pairing is not effective
The program regularly assesses the quality of services provided by coaches to candidates, using criteria including participant feedback, direct observation of coaching, growth of candidate on established criteria, and compliance with program requirements.
Induction program leaders provide formative feedback to coaches on their work.

What skills does a coach need?

    The coach needs skills that apply to:
    • Goal setting and action planning
    • Use of appropriate coaching instruments
    • Selection of appropriate formative and summative assessments
    • Holding self and candidate accountable
    • Effectively building relationships, trust, and maintaining confidentiality
    • Seeing and communicating different perspectives

What attributes benefit a coach's mindset?

    A coach may find the following traits helpful when coaching:
    • Nonjudgmental
    • A Possibility Thinker
    • Compassionate
    • Inspirational
    • Personable
    • Intuitive
    • Sincere
    • Trustworthy
    • Trustworthy
    • A Risk Taker
    • Action Oriented
    • Focused on Results
    • Knows Core Coaching Competencies
    • Curious

What might a process for the selection and hiring of coaches be?

    There are various processes for identifying, selecting and hiring coaches that are dependent on the program sponsor's approach, the candidate's needs, and available resources. The following is an example of a process used by one of the state's largest coaching consortiums. For this program, local affiliates are responsible to hire coaches who meet the sponsoring institution's criteria, but the sponsoring institution takes responsibility to train, monitor, and retain only those coaches who fulfill coaching responsibilities successfully.

    1. Review credential candidate applications and determine the current coaching needs (this is best done through an advisement meeting).
    2. Review the cadre of current coach applications and their accompanying coach profiles for possible coach selection and candidate match.
      1. Select and match coaches who possess similar background experiences to that of each candidate. For example, match a coach with elementary experience with candidate placed at an elementary site or a coach with urban experience with candidate placed in urban setting. While similar experience is preferred, it may not always be possible do to availability and/or candidate job-site location
      2. All coaches:
        1. are required to attend the blended coaching training which includes program outcomes and tools used in the program
        2. must complete a rigorous certification process
        3. are qualified to coach all credential candidates
      3. Coaches who are not yet trained may be selected and matched based on their application and profile, then must complete coach training prior to the start of an assignment and commit to the expected ongoing training as well as submit a coaching portfolio for certification
    3. Contact the selected coach applicant to determine availability.
    4. Inform the potential coach of the required ongoing training sessions for the year.
    5. Complete MOU between
      1. the coach and the local program
      2. the candidate and the local program
    6. Maintain coach application files and résumés.
    7. Submit selected coach applications and résumés to the consortium office. 

How can coaches assess their own growth?

    There are various ways a coach might assess her or his growth. S/he can
    • Interview colleagues for self-evaluation
    • Ask for feedback from the candidate
    • Ask for feedback from the Program Supervisor
    • Keep and review journals
    • Personally reflect on evidence that documents coach behaviors, such as efficacy, flexibility, consciousness, craftsmanship, and/or interdependence

How do induction program leaders know that coaches are effective?

    • Induction program leaders provide formative and summative feedback to coaches about their work. The program regularly assesses the quality of services coaches provide to candidates, using information from different types of assessments, such as, participant feedback, direct observation of coaching, growth of candidates on established criteria, and compliance with program requirements, for example:

      1. Coaching Pre & Post Assessment
        This assessment is designed to specifically measure coaching skills of the coach. It should be aligned to the research-based coaching approach identified by the administrator induction program.

      2. Coach Background Inventory
        This inventory allows for information regarding the strengths, interests and potential of the coaches. It assists the program in matching a candidate with a coach. It also allows the program to track areas of need for recruitment of coaches (e.g., more coaches with high school or urban experience).

      3. Observation and Feedback by Peers & Program
        Coaches are formally observed during the coaching process either through direct observation or a video recording. Additionally, coaches may receive formal written feedback from peers during coaching practice sessions or coaching meetings. This is an opportunity for the program staff to observe skills and interactions among other coaches. These observations can provide useful information in the assignments and development of professional learning for coaches.

      The following table illustrates an example of how different types of assessments over the course of an induction program can be sequenced to provide coaches with ongoing information about their effectiveness and areas of development.

      BeginningMid-PointConclusion
      • Application and Screening Criteria
      • Coach Background Inventory
      • Training and Certification
      • Coaching Pre-Assessment
      • Coach Self-Reflection
      • Candidate Feedback/Survey
      • Coaching Logs
      • Candidate Feedback/Survey
      • Candidate Growth (e.g. CPSEL Assessment, IIP Progress, etc.)
      • Coaching Post-Assessment
      Ongoing Formative
      • Observation and Feedback by Peers
      • Observation and Feedback by Program
      • Coaching Log Reviews
      • IIP Development
      • Individual Coaching Growth Plan
Updated March 14, 2017